Wednesday, April 29, 2015

The Fable of the Fish: The Boiling Bowl: or, Girls Gone Marxist

Magazine: “Aquatic Life” (1917)
The Fable of the Fish
The Boiling Bowl: or, Girls Gone Marxist

Some angry creatures gathered once

with grievances in mind

on how they felt society

conspired against their kind.

We'll call them “fish” since that themselves

they once did call in claim,

although it's certain that you know

them by another name.

Inside a bowl, upon a shelf,

in a department store,

they reinforced their discontent,

and shunned outside rapport,

renounced the Strengths they could have played,

chose pessimism's pull:

“Our bowl, it is half empty! Don't

dare say it is half full!”

With anger they topped off their bowl.

Each echoed marx's name.

Not one fish thought to look toward self,

but sought something to blame.

Each clenched right fin into a fist,

and thrust it toward the air,

then swam in circles leftward...

never getting anywhere.

Across the aisle, in Games and Sports,

were bicycles displayed.

Each built for action, work, or speed;

the fuming fish surveyed

and through their fish-eye view assumed

each bike of dark ideals,

“All bikes were built for just one thing:

crush us beneath their wheels!”

The bikes were taken quite aback,

sought to this fear relieve.

But the fish rallied, fist fins high,

with “Swim left and believe!”

The fish bowl boiled over and

splashed water everywhere

and when, at last, the rage died down,

no bike was standing there.

The bikes had moved to aisle far

from undeserv'ed rage,

then lived their lives as each thought best;

the fish stayed in their cage.

So, here the story ends and if

a moral's what you wish...

then, “men need marxist feminists

like bicycles need fish.”

 

 

 

 

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The Fable of the Fish, Copyright © 2015 Papa Possum

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